Guerlain unveils Mitsouko flacon in association with Arita Porcelain lab

Recently French Maison Guerlain unveiled a limited edition of the iconic Mitsouko perfume flacon in collaboration with celebrated ceramic crafters- Arita Porcelain lab. Hand crafted to perfection with the use of traditional techniques, the flacon is adorned with age-old symbols of good fortune, tradition and modernity. The exclusive edition also celebrates the porcelain maker’s 400th year of ceramic history.

Guerlain was founded in 1828, when Pierre-François Pascal Guerlain opened his perfume store at 42, rue de Rivoli in Paris. The creation of Eau de Cologne Impériale for French Emperor Napoleon III and his Spanish-French wife Empress Eugénie earned the prestigious title of being His Majesty’s Official Perfumer. 1889’s Jicky, the first fragrance described as a ‘parfum’ to use synthetic ingredients alongside natural extracts. L’Heure Bleue, Mitsouko, Shalimar and Vol de Nuit are known as Guerlain’s most famous classics.

Mitsouko, the mythic Guerlain perfume whose name means ‘mystery’ in Japanese, and whose name was borrowed from the lead female character in Claude Farrère’s novel ‘La Bataille’ that speaks of the love affair between a British naval officer and the wife of a Japanese admiral during the Russo-Japanese War.

Created in 1919 by Jacques Guerlain, Mitsouko is known as ‘a masterpiece of balance’. The fragrance has remained as exceptional as ever over the years, emblematic of the timeless appeal that characterizes the chypre fragrance family.

Mitsouko initiated the use of the peach note in perfumery. Illustrating the innovative side of its creators, Mitsouko is the first fruity chypre fragrance in the perfume world, following other chypre fragrances introduced by Guerlain.

The original Mitsouko perfume flacon was designed by Georges Chevalier. The flacon is underscored with graceful scrolls typical of Art Nouveau. Its avant-garde stopper, in the form of a hollowed heart, represented a real technical feat at the time.

The unique flacon reflects onto the history of Mitsouko, whose name was borrowed from the lead female character in Claude Farrère’s novel ‘La Bataille’ that speaks of the love affair between a British naval officer and the wife of a Japanese admiral during the Russo-Japanese War.

Now the French Maison’s perfume-making savoir-faire meets the artisanal excellence of Arita Porcelain Lab in this stunning interpretation of the iconic Mitsouko perfume flacon. Crafted entirely by hand using traditional techniques, the flacon is decorated with symbols of good fortune, melding tradition and modernity.

A flagship of Japan’s ceramic industry, the Arita workshop has decorated the Mitsouko flacon with auspicious symbols. They include the rising sun – traditionally equated with ‘clear skies’ and good fortune – the paulownia to represent elegance, a plum tree, symbolizing life, the peony to ward off negative energy, and the chrysanthemum that represents longevity.

Arita porcelain is one of Japan’s traditional handicrafts. The traditional techniques used to make Arita porcelain have been improved on with craft and design to meet the needs of modern lifestyles. The result is a simple, contemporary style of vessel, produced with the finest handwork expected from Japan’s artisans.

This collaboration between the perfumer and porcelain artisan is featured in an exhibition at the Guerlain boutique on the Champs Élysées, showcasing both the Mitsouko flacon and emblematic pieces from the Japanese porcelain workshop.

The Guerlain Mitsouko Arita Porcelain lab Limited Edition is available in an empty 75ml flacon that comes with a refil. The set will cost collectors round €380 and is available at Guerlain boutiques and selected stores worldwide. Come into the beautiful worlds of Guerlain and Arita Porcelain lab.

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