Remember Estée

Estee Lauder

Cosmetics capitalist Estée Lauder (Josephine Esther Mentzer) died at 95 on this date, 24 april, in 2004. She was born to Hungarian immigrants who ran a hardware store, and she became interested in cosmetics through the work of her uncle, a chemist who developed beauty products and fragrances. In 1953, she introduced her first fragrance, Youth Dew, a bath oil and perfume that sold 50,000 bottles in its first year and 150 million by 1984. She co-founded her eponymous company in 1946 with her husband Joseph Lauder (whom she divorced and then remarried); today it has 42,000 employees and nearly $12 billion in annual net sales.

 

 

 

The Make-Up Man

Max Factor at work2

Max Factor at work (Click photo to enlarge).

Max Factor, one of the famous names in Western cosmetics, was born in Lodz, Poland, in 1877, and began his career as an apprentice to a wig maker. By 20, he was running his own makeup shop.

Polish-born Maksymilian Faktorowicz, had been apprenticed at 9 to a wigmaker and cosmetician and had developed into a well-known theatrical make-up artist. After emigrating to the U.S. 1902. They never returned. He began selling hair goods, imported cosmetics and establishing the Max Factor cosmetics company in time for the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, developed stage greasepaints for local stage actors in St. Louis.

As his local fame spread, actors from the emerging film industry also came to Max for make-up advice. Thus, the motion picture industry, then beginning in Hollywood, beckoned. He settled in Los Angeles with his family in 1909 and got a job with the Pantages Theatre.
By 1914, he was perfecting make up for the movies. He had improvised a new alternative to dye greasepaint, which he thought looked dreadful and ‘terrifying’ on the screen.
He formed flexible greasepaint, which was the first make up created for film. It helped make actresses look more natural in close up.
In 1918, he developed his ‘colour harmony’ face powder range, which allowed him to create make up for each individual based on their skin tones, due to the wide range of shades on offer.

Max Factor at work3

Max Factor at work (Click photo to enlarge).

Creating false eyelashes, the eyebrow pencil, lip gloss, and pancake make up, Factor created a whole new language for screen cosmetics.
Inevitably, once the actresses had been made to look so stylish on screen, they wanted to maintain the same effect in everyday life, so they wore the new Max Factor ‘make up’ in personal appearances. Soon, women unconnected with the theatre or the film industry were asking for the make up, so that they too could look glamorous.

Max Factor Bette Davis Nail Polish 1939

In 1934 he introduced Liquid Nail Enamel, forerunner of today’s nail enamels, here with Bette Davis for Life Magazine (Click photo to enlarge).

Max Factor Ruby Keeler Makeup, 1935

Max Factor ad with Hollywood Star: Ruby Keeler, 1935 (Click photo to enlarge).

In 1920 he developed the “Color Harmony” principles of makeup, which held that ‘certain combinations of a woman’s complexion, hair and eye coloring were most effectively complemented by specific makeup shades’.

By the 1920s, Max’s sons were heavily involved in the business with Davis working as general manager and Frank helping his father to develop new products. They received their biggest single make up order during this decade in 1925 when they had to provide 600 gallons of light olive make up to the film set of ‘Ben Hur’ to ensure that the extras filming in America had the same colour skin as the extras who filmed in Italy.

max factor pancake

Max Factor Pan Cake ad with Hollywood Star Merle Oberon in the movie ‘The Love Of Madame Sand’. (Click photo to enlarge).

Judy Garland Max Factor Pancake2

Max Factor Pan Cake ad with Hollywood Star Judy Garland in the movie ‘Till The Clouds Roll By’, with Lena Horn, Frank Sinatra and Robert Walker, 1946 (Click photo to enlarge).

Another key development in the make up world was the invention of waterproof mascara for the film ‘Mare Nostrum’ in 1926.
It was in 1927 that Max Factor introduced his first cosmetics to be sold to non-theatrical consumers. Before Max Factor, few women used cosmetics. Factor popularised both the word “make up” and the use (and abuse) of the cosmetic repertoire.
Credited as the father of modern make up, Max Factor is responsible for inventing many key cosmetic products (for both on screen and off) and is still the inspiration behind beauty trends and innovations today.

Max Factor

A portrait of American cosmetics executive Max Factor.  (Photo by Hulton, ca 1960).

He died on 30 August 1938 at the age of 59. His son, Frank, who renamed himself Max Factor, Jr., popularized the term ‘make-up’, which had formerly been reserved for theater people, and took his father’s Hollywood business into the broad world, building the Max Factor Cosmetics empire, created, pancake make-up and smear-proof lipstick, built on his father’s innovations. He continued to be involved with the company until the 1970s, seeing the company create make up shades for US Marines during the second world war, offer male products such as shampoo and aftershave and launch its first female fragrance in 1955. Mac Factor jr. died at 91 in Los Angeles on this date in 1996.

Max Factor Rita Hayworth lip gloss

Max Factor ad for new lipsticks with Hollywood Star Rita Hayworth who is starring in ‘Down To Earth’, 1947

Max Factor’s most notable clients were Mary Pickford, Claudette Colbert, Jean Harlow, Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Gloria Swanson, Rita Hayworth, Judy Garland, Dinah Shore, Lena Horne, Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn and Farrah Fawcett, all of whom became regular visitors at his salons.

In the 1970s, the third generation of Factors rose to senior positions but wanted to focus on their own interests, leading the firm to first be bought by Revlon and then Proctor & Gamble in 1991

Norma Jeane Marilyn Monroe Max Factor

t’s been more than 50 years since Marilyn Monroe’s death, but there’s no doubt the famed actress’ signature beauty is still recognized around the globe. So much so that Max Factor has announced Monroe as the new global ambassador for its latest ads, celebrating the makeup label’s 80th anniversary.

The late starlet was a longtime client of founder Max Factor’s son Max Factor Jr. in the ’40s, when she was known as Norma Jeane Mortenson. According to the beauty brand’s post on its Facebook page, Max Factor credits its makeup with helping transform the innocent-looking young lady into the sex symbol she’s known as today (“From Norma Jeane to Marilyn Monroe, Created by Max Factor,” reads the campaign’s tagline).

Marilyn Monroe Max Factor

“Marilyn made the sultry red lip, creamy skin and dramatically lined eyes the most famous beauty look of the Forties and it’s a look that continues to dominate the beauty and fashion industry,” said Pat McGrath, Max Factor’s global creative design director. “It is the ultimate look that defines glamour, nothing else compares.” (Click photo to enlarge).

Given that Max Factor seems to favor past beauty icons (the brand’s former face, Gwyneth Paltrow, channeled Audrey Hepburn and Farrah Fawcett for her campaign), it comes as no surprise that the company would choose the blond bombshell as its new face.

Marilyn Monroe Max Factor

This isn’t the first time that Monroe has been associated with a beauty brand even after her death. The platinum-blonde Hollywood star had a make-up collection dedicated to her by MAC in 2012 and had been the face of Chanel No.5 campaigns in 2013

by Jean Amr

Clinique, the fabulous and incredible story!

A few weeks ago, I told you the fabulous story of Estee Lauder… this month, it is the turn of the fabulous mark dermatological clinic (little sister of Estee Lauder) that revolutionized the beauty industry.

“Can we create a beautiful skin?” This is the famous question of the editor-in-Chief of American Vogue, Carol Phillips, asked in 1967.

Carol Phillips Clinique

Carol Phillips wearing the original Clinique Consultants White Coat with the Skin Computer est in 1968 for Estee Lauder Cosmetics found in fine department stores (Click photo to enlarge).

A question that circumnavigated the world in no time and that revolutionized the world of beauty and cosmetics. An issue that especially gave birth to the very famous brand Clinique! And behind the design and the success of the brand is a true team effort, a trio of experts: the know-how of Dr. Norman Orentreich, the determination of the editor in Chief of Vogue USA Carol Phillips and the expertise of the Estee Lauder group.

The origins of Clinique when the curiosity of a Chief Editor joined the knowledge of a famous dermatologist and arrives at the ears of the determined Madam Estée Lauder, the result can be that fabulous and is proudly named Clinique.

Clinique 3-Step Vintage

The universe of beauty and cosmetics has always piqued the curiosity of Carol Phillips, it is quite natural that she decided to turn to Dr. Norman Orentreich. He is the pioneer of hair implants, transplantation surgery and the first President of the American society for Dermatologic Surgery. Dermatological Clinique guide, it has always been him and to this day, his two children, David and Catherine, who take the notes as consultants dermatologists for the brand.

It is during an interview granted to journalist, in 1967, the famous doctor revealed its most beautiful secrets. These same secrets that fidélisaient it a rich client (the personalities of the world of politics, fashion and show) including the famous ‘clean, exfoliate, moisturize’, the premise of Basic 3 time, either the winning formula to create and maintain beautiful skin. Following this interview, Carol Phillips devoted a full article on these 3 magic words, seducing everyone in its path, time where women prefer to hide their problems of skin rather than the process, including the large Estee Lauder! consultant dermatologists for the brand. For the record, it is Evelyn Lauder, daughter-in-law of Estee (wife of Leonard Lauder) who first read the article of journalist. She was completely fascinated by the words of Carol Phillips and especially by the advice of Dr. Orentreich. Is the idea to make a mark was imminent? May be Yes, may be not.. .but Evelyn wanted at any price that Estée read the article, because she knew that the latter would be interested.

Clinique vintage ad

Indeed, Mrs. Lauder was charmed, but not only… This great lady wanted to create, innovate and revolutionize once more, the universe of beauty (after the success of Youth Dew and Re-Nutriv). Thus, the meeting of Carol Phillips, and Dr. Norman Orentreich for Estée Lauder gave life to a prestigious and dermatological brand both: Clinique! A brand 100% without fragrance, hypoallergenic and performing everything simply.

In regards to the name, some say that Estee Lauder, walking in Paris has noticed the facade of a ‘aesthetic clinique’ and therefore borrowed the word ‘Clinique’. While others argue that it is Evelyn Lauder who had found the name in full agreement with the clinical and dermatological brand image and who was the first to wear the famous iconic white coat of the company, after having been designated Director of Training

Where to start? What exactly? This is what the trio attempted to discover! Between the creativity of Carol Phillips, Dr. Orentreich know-how and expertise of Estée Lauder, there were sufficient resources to launch a novelty in the world of cosmetics. Therefore, under the impetus of the Estee Lauder group and the professionalism of the three personalities that the clinic brand emerged in 1968. Everything went very quickly and in August of the same year, the brand unveiled its credo: be and remain true, inform, serve and satisfy.

And to determine the type of skin, the brand dermatologists and researchers have proudly designed the computer of beauty, a precision tool, this only in the premises of the brand. At the time of the consultation, each person-specific criteria are entered. The generated results are based on the genetic and specific criteria. For example, a blonde with blue eyes will be a priori, a more delicate skin than a brunette with dark eyes. In the same context, there are factors such as fatigue, seasons, climate, or medical treatments. Clinic has understood, tailor-made is the winning formula:

In the custom addition concepts of prevention and protection. What does it mean? Simply that each product is tested for allergies and guarantees a 100% fragrance-free formula. Each formula is tested at least 12 times on 600 people, what makes 7200 applications. And any allergic or negative reaction, the formula is returned to the laboratory. One goal: create beautiful skins with proper dermatological care.

The recipe for beautiful skin, here it is! Thanks to the advice of Dr.Orentreich, the Estée Lauder company has succeeded in creating the perfect care: Basic of 3 products: a soap, for a perfect cleaning, a clarifying lotion based on salicylic acid to exfoliate the skin, and finally a moisturizer. Since his arrival on the market, in 1968, this shock trio that meets the Dermatologic formula ‘clean, exfoliate, moisturize’ did not fail to seduce.

Clinique would not have been possible without sons Lauder, Leonard and Ronald. Indeed, just before the creation of the brand, Estée turned to her eldest son, Leonard, to talk to him about his idea to develop hypoallergenic care. Together they collaborated, analysed the beauty market and decided that it was time to offer women the proper care to finally have beautiful skin.

Clinique 3 Step

Clinique 3-Steps (Click photo to enlarge).

At the time, President of the brand was Carol Phillips, and in eight months only, the journalist managed to establish a process to ensure that the new brand is spawning a niche in the market. The youngest of Estée, Ronald Lauder was Vice President of the company.

Yet, the startup was not relaxing. Although it aroused the curiosity of others, Clinique failed to meet a great success at its launch. Millions of dollars injected into the company  In 1975, the brand denounced a consequent loss of at least $ 3 million. The reasons behind this? People did not yet know the benefits of hypoallergenic products and preferred to conceal rather than to treat. But Carol Phillips, Leonard Lauder and Ronald Lauder believed that Clinicque would become quickly one of the leaders in the world of cosmetics and beauty. It was enough just to help them discover the brand and the benefits of using products without fragrances, hypoallergenic and suitable for their skin.

Three years after this big loss of funds, clinic was able to earn $ 80 million, almost 30% of the revenues of the Estee Lauder company. Great news for the brand which attracted the attention of journalists, more specifically those of the Forbes magazine “the Lauder family will never lowered arms. Instead, they drew the best of these losses and took advantage of it to feed the business”. Like what, with patience and determination, there is always the potential to operate and as stated so well in English, “there’s always room for improvement!”.

Clinique Acne Solutions

Clinique Acne Solutions (Click photo to enlarge).

You have probably noticed that there is never a ‘Muse’ (a -famous- face) at Clinique. The company is based on a credo simple and direct: “the product is the hero!” and has always adopted a ‘different’ marketing…

Between dermatological care, cosmetics and perfumes, clinic will conquered quickly the U.S, French and the British. The make-up, and in particular the fonds de teints, are positioned at the top of the standings with at least 200 colors, 12 fluid forms, 7 presentations 3 textures creams and powders. All, of course, carved on the precision and own clinic dermatological expertise. We remember also that it is the first brand to evoke a mens line, UV filters and antioxidants.

Clinique Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion Charm

Clinique Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion+ Breast Cancer Awareness Pink Ribbon.2015 edition (Click photo to enlarge)

In support of Breast Cancer Awareness, each year Clinique offers a special, limited-edition bottle of its Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion+. The limited-edition version of Clinique’s Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion+ is adorned with a Clinique key ring with four charms including a Breast Cancer Awareness Pink Ribbon.

Flying through the time:

1968: Seeing daylight: Clinique, under the direction of the Estee Lauder group, the inspiration of journalist Carol Phillips and the expertise of Dr. Norman Orentreich

1969: Clinic focuses more closely to the international market and expands in France and the United Kingdom, with only the famous 3 time Basic product/kit. Today, Dramatically Different Moisturizing Lotion, the third step, is still the company’s top selling moisturiser.

1970: The first Foundation, called Continuous Coverage happens. Concealing defects and a sunscreen, this ‘2 in 1’ continues, even today!

1971: Clinique lifts the veil on her first perfume, Aromatics Elixir, a floral oriental crossing modes

Clinque Exlir

Clinique Aromatics Elixir Luxe for Women Parfum Extract Reserve Edition Prestige 40th Anniversary (Click photo to enlarge). 

1976: Care for men finally arrive! Called ‘Skin Supplies For Men’, this line consists of lotions, scrubs, creams… in short. All that it takes for the modern male. Note that it is the first cosmetic range specifically developed for men!

Clinique for Men

Clinique for Men (Click photo to enlarge).

1978: The company is addressing to the international market. This year underlines its arrival in the Japan, South Africa and the Venezuela

1991: The 1990s were very enriching for the brand. The first Sun care, City Block SPF15, made its appearance. Finally a screen light and especially without chemical filter for everyday use!

Clinique SPF 30 Body Cream Sun

Two products from the Clinique Sun Care range. Clinique SPF 30 Face and Body Cream (CLick phot to enlarge).

1991: After a flawless Sun care, clinic decided to test these products in a different way. It was aboard the U.S. shuttle that the mark was conducting tests in weightlessness

1992: Clinique puts the competitive bar even higher, by proposing the first care with salicylic acid, called Turnaround. Regenerated and radiant skin with the first applications, a true revolution in the world of beauty!

2006: When the cosmetic brand joined the dermatological research, the result is quite impressive, where the arrival of the Clinique Skin Wellness Center at Weill Cornell Science in the United States

2007: Clinic innovates once again and offers training in 3 steps, called the “Accredited Program”. It is aimed at advisers and customers who wish to enhance their knowledge

2008: Clinic tackles skin problems. Four launches so that each type of skin can benefit from proper care: Even Better, Anti Blemish, Pore Refining Solutions and Redness Solution

2011: Clinique wins the ‘Prize of the Excellence of Beauty’ offered by Marie-Claire

2013: The brand combines price and takes advantage of Elle International Beauty Awards

2014: The Skin Supplies For Men range Gets a makeover and becomes clinical for Men.

by Jean Amr

 

Countess Mona von Bismarck and Cristobal Balenciaga

Countess Mona von Bismarck, the queen of the international cafe society according to Vogue. Cecil Beaton described her as a ‘rock-crystal goddess’. Coco Chanel voted her to be the best dressed woman in the world and Cristobal Balenciaga was her close friend and favourite designer. The fashion conscious Countess Mona von Bismarck developed a vèry close relationship with the world renowned designer Cristobal Balenciaga and lasted for almost 30 years. It is reported that on one occasion when most of her clothes were destroyed in a railroad accident she ordered over 150 dresses from the couturier in one setting.

Balenciaga Countess Mona von Bismarck - Cecil Beaton Paris

Countess Mona von Bismarck wearing Cristobal Balenciaga (Photo by Cecil Beaton)(Click photo to enlarge).

Balenciaga Countess Mona von Bismarck - Cecil Beaton Paris 2

Countess Mona von Bismarck wearing Cristobal Balenciaga (Photo by Cecil Beaton)(Click photo to enlarge).

In May 1968, during the manifestations and general strike in Paris, when Balenciaga retired, as an act of mouring, Countess Mona von Bismarck shut herself behind closed doors sipping champagne for three days. Finis Mundi.

by Jean Amr

A piece of History: Perfume Houses, Annick Goutal

Annick Goutal Hadrian Yakymour

Annick Goutal Eau d’Hadrien (Click photo to enlarge).

Music and fragrance speak the same language: they’re composed of notes, harmonies – and the finished ‘juice’ we take such pleasure in is known as a ‘composition’. So it’s not so surprising that Annick Goutal, who dedicated her early life to playing the piano, with the dream of being a pianist, should turn, instead, to creating perfumes (which today are loved around the world).

Annick Goutal was born in Aix-en-Provence, the third daughter of a family of eight children, with a father who was a confectioner; as a child, she liked nothing better than tying up chocolates and small packets of sweets with beautiful ribbons – when she wasn’t practising piano. At the age of 16, she won first prize for piano at the prestigious Versailles Conservatory – but not long after, abandoned her pianist dream when the pressure became too much. She moved to London and found work as an au pair, where her classic beauty and slender silhouette was ‘spotted’ by legendary photographer David Bailey. And who better to launch someone on their modelling career…?

camille-goutal-and-isabelle-doyen

Madame Camille Goutal and long time collaborator, master perfumer Isabelle Doyen were on hand to celebrate the new Annick Goutal Boutique 955 Madison Avenue opening (Click photo to enlarge).

Always intellectual, always questioning, Annick had doubts about her new career: how could she accept earning a living so effortlessly? She moved back to Paris, opened an antique shop (Folavril, after a character in a Boris Vian novel). She had her first daughter, Camille. The door of the antique shop closed, another opened: Annick began helping a friend launch a beauty store selling plant-based creams. An echo of her childhood, Annick Goutal set about designing confectionery-style packaging, tied with elegant ribbon bows.

The beauty products needed a fragrance – so Annick headed to Grasse, still the heartland of perfumery today. And it was meeting with a perfumer, Henri Sorsana from fragrance house Robertet, which opened Annick Goutal’s eyes, and more importantly her nose, to what became her true vocation. Before very long, Annick gave up modelling, and instead became a perfumer, showing exceptional talent. She spent four years training, rediscovering the musical language she’d left behind, translated to the world of olfaction.

Annick Goutal Eau Shop Counter Yakymour

Annick Goutal shop counter (Click photo to enlarge).

By chance, at a dinner, Annick had rediscovered her teenage love, Alain Meunier (who she’d met 20 years before at the music conservatory), who was now a famous cellist. She liked nothing better than to listen to Alain practising for a concert, while she played on her own ‘organ’: the array of precious oils and fragrance elements used to compose perfumes.

Annick Goutal Eau Shop Counter Yakymour

In 1981, Annick Goutal created her first signature perfume, Folavrl, with its touches of tomato leaf. It was soon followed by L’Eau d’Hadrien, still worn and loved all over the world by men and women for its timeless, citrus-powered freshness. Her gift: to capture the memories of people she loved, landscapes, and moments which touched her life. Perfume-lovers picked up on that, and she joined the ranks of French ‘haute parfumerie’.

Annick Goutal Eau d'Hadrien Eau de Toilette YakymourAnnick Goutal, Eau d’Hadrien. A universal perfume inspired by a Tuscany landscape, Eau d’Hadrien is the expression of Annick Goutal’s deep passion for Italy, named after Roman Emperer Hadrian, who was a great lover of arts and ‘everything’ beautiful (Click photo to enlarge).

In 1986, Annick was joined along the way by equally gifted ‘nose’. And the reputation of Annick Goutal spread around the world; by the 1990s, the collection was in the ‘top five’ in leading department stores like Saks and Nieman Marcus, fuelled by the popularity of fragrances like the exquisite floral bouquet of Gardénia Passion, blowsily delectable Rose Absolue, and breezy Eau du Sud. Each new fragrance embodied the French ‘art de vivre’, or way of being: that seductive mix of simplicity and extreme sophistication, so admired around the world.

Annick Goutal Eau du Sud Eau de Toilette Yakymour

Annick Goutal, Eau du Sud. The recollection of a summer evening in Provence, where the daylight seems to be never ending (Click photo to enlarge).

Unbelievably sadly, Annick Goutal died in 1999, at the age of just 53, after a long battle with cancer. Fragrances, of course, are a kind of immortality, but more than that, Annick Goutal passed on her love of rich, complex fragrances to her talented daughter and ‘muse’ Camille. (Camille was the inspiration for both Eau de Camille, and Petite Chérie, a fragrance composed for young women.)

Camille studied Literature at ‘A’ Level, then took courses in art, photography and design at the Louvre Museum School. It led to a career in photography. But scent beckoned. She’d grown up surrounded by it, at the family’s homes in Paris and on the Ile de Ré, whose salt-tanged breezes inspired Annick Goutal Les Sables.

Her mother’s legacy was hugely important to her. And in 1999, Camille took her first steps as ‘Aromatique Majeur’ for her mother’s perfume house. So the baton was passed, and today, there’s a fresh duet at Annick Goutal: Camille Goutal, composing beside Isabelle Doyen, and it’s among the few houses in the world to have its own in-house perfumers.

Annick Goutal Ninfeo Mio Eau de Toilette Yakymour

Annick Goutal, Ninfeo Mio. The rendition of a wonder-filled stroll through an Italian garden crossed by the Ninfeo river (Click photo to enlarge).

This isn’t someone simply to follow in her mother’s footsteps, though: the innately stylish Camille’s definitely imprinted her own signature at Annick Goutal. As she told The Perfume Society’s Jo Fairley, ‘Unlike my mother, who created Eau de Camille and Eau de Charlotte for me and my sister, I tend not to make my fragrances too ‘personal’, or based on people and places that are sentimental to me. Un Matin d’Orage, for instance, was inspired by a stormy morning on a business trip to Tokyo…’

Other creations have included Les Nuits d’Hadrien (a more sensual version of her mother’s iconic Cologne), bewitchingly exotic Mandragore, and cool, green Ninfeo Mio, inspired by the legendary gardens of Ninfa, just outside Rome (let’s talk about this fragrances later).

Annick Goutal Les Nuits d'Hadrien Eau de Toilette Yakymour

Annick Goutal, Les Nuits d’Hadrien. The illustration of a Tuscan lanscape at dusk, set ablaze by a late afternoon sun (Click photo to enlarge).

Importantly, Camille and Isabelle continue to enjoy complete creative freedom – able to put together notes and harmonies unfettered by ‘marketing briefs’. Annick Goutal would herself surely be so proud of each and every beautiful new composition.

Like she is saying: “We like to think of them as music, for the nose…”

More info at http://www.annickgoutal.com/en/

by Jean Amr

Perfume Houses: Téo Cabanel

Téo Cabanel

Teo Theodore Cabanel

Theodore Cabanel

Théodore Cabanel created the brand in 1893 and he was not a perfumer, he was a doctor. But he was growing orange trees in Nigeria and because he was in the business of raw materials, he decided to make perfumes. He discovered that he was gifted in making them and created around 200 formulas in less than 30 years. Théodore Cabanel creates prestigious Colognes and Quintessences for “extraits de mouchoirs”. An elegant crowd rapidly adopts the Cabanel fragrances.

His daughter chooses to follow in her father’s footsteps in the true tradition of “Maître Parfumeur”. She rapidly becomes the Duchess of Windsor’s favorite perfumer.

Duke Edward VIII and Duchess Wallis Simpson

‘Julie’ was inspired by a very old formula, it was the perfume worn by the Duchess of Windsor. She was Téo Cabanel’s main client between the 1930s and the 1960s

(Click photo to enlarge).

TEO CABANEL Eau de Parfum

Caroline Ilacqua steps into the picture in 2003. Only 22 years old at the time, she boldly takes up the torch and expressing her own sensitivity gives a zip to the timeless fragrances. Working hand in hand with Jean-François Latty, one of the best in the profession, she opens a new chapter in this great adventure. Together, they take their inspiration from the more than 150 emblematic Cabanel perfume formulas. They venture to play the score with their own modern interpretation. Some formulas are very ‘old-fashioned’, using some ingredients that are not allowed anymore … ‘Even if we wanted, we would not be able to make it again. But some are still good and we just have to work a bit on them’.

TEO CABANEL Eau de Parfum Toilette

Alamhine, Oha, Early Roses, Julia, Méloé, Hegoa

(Click photo to enlarge)

Today, it may be said that Teo Cabanel has re-invented exceptional perfumes which combine natural elegance and richness, the authentic sign of High French Perfumery. As the creator of rare refined fragrances, Teo Cabanel brings the utmost care to each and every one of its perfume creations. You cannot fail to recognize them for the quality of their fragrances and their unique design. We make no compromise on the quality. Only the purest, most natural and noble ingredients will do.

Caroline Ilacqua Téo Cabanel

Caroline Ilacqua (Click photo to enlarge).

Chairman of the Board, Teo Cabanel brand’ owner. Born in Fontainebleau (France) in 1981 Caroline Ilacqua inherits the Téo Cabanel company when she is barely 22. Upon graduating in International Business in Paris and Dublin, she started working in the field of advertising with Ogilvy & Mather. A few months later, her godmother, the daughter of Théodore Cabanel, names her sole heir of the Téo Cabanel brand. She was suddenly owner of not only an old perfume house full of stories but also a precious book with ancient fragrance formulas, and she decides to highlight this valuable heritage. Taking root in this formidable past, she launches forward with her fervent creativity and dedication to quality. She creates around Teo Cabanel a whole olfactory universe dominated by pure, natural and precious ingredients. The brand was brought back to life and is now more active than ever

Jean-Francois Latty Noise Teo Cabanel

Jean-François Latty

After graduating from the Roure Perfume Institute in Grasse, Jean-François Latty starts to work for Roure in Paris creating his first fragrances. In 1970, he joins Roure USA and after a year is hired by International Flavors and Fragrances (IFF). In 1987, Takasago asks him to join the company and he sets off numerous successful fragrances. In 2000, he created JFL Creations a company specialized in perfume creation and in selling natural ingredients.

Téo Cabanel

Immediately attracted by the Téo Cabanel heritage, Jean-François Latty asked by Caroline Ilacqua  to become Téo Cabanel’s official perfumer. Quality doesn’t mix with compromise! Such is Latty’s motto and philosophy for all his creations. Thus, his fragrances don’t derive from marketing trends and passing fashion.

More on Teo Cabanel’s scent’s soon, here at Yakymour.

for more information:

http://www.teo-cabanel.com/en/parfums

by Jean Amr

Elizabeth Arden

Florence Nightingale Graham (December 31, 1878 – October 18, 1966), who went by the business name Elizabeth Arden was born in 1878 in Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada. Her parents had emigrated to Canada from Cornwall, United Kingdom, in the 1870s. Her father, William Graham, was Scottish and her mother, Susan, was Cornish and had arranged for a wealthy aunt in Cornwall to pay for her children’s education. Arden dropped out of nursing school in Toronto.

She then joined her elder brother in Manhattan, New York, working briefly as a  bookkeeper for the E.R. Squibb Pharmaceuticals Company. She then worked, again briefly, for Eleanor Adair, an early beauty culturist, as a ‘treatment girl’. While there, Arden spent hours in their lab, learning about skincare.

Florence Nightingale Graham, who went by the business name Elizabeth Arden, was became a businesswoman who founded what is now Elizabeth Arden, Inc., and built a cosmetics empire in the United States. At the peak of her career, she was one of the wealthiest and well know women in the world!

Elizabeth Arden

Elizabeth Arden: “every woman has the right to be beautiful.” With that philosophy, she launched advertising campaigns to help normalize the use of makeup across the country.

In 1909 Arden formed a partnership with Elizabeth Hubbard, another culturist. When the partnership dissolved, she coined the business name ‘Elizabeth Arden’ from her former partner and from ‘Tenneyson’s poem ‘Enoch Arden’. With a $6,000 loan from her brother, she then used the shop space to open her first salon on 5th Avenue.

In 1912 Arden traveled to France to learn beauty and facial massage techniques used in the Paris beauty salons.She returned with a collection of rouges (blushers) and tinted powders she had created. Arden was, in 1914, the first to introduce modern eye makeup to North America after her formal training in Paris.

In 1915 Elizabeth Arden married Thomas j. Lewis, an American Banker. By this marriage, she was automatically a naturalized American citizen. In the same year started to operate and Arden international she opened salons around the world, all with a red door, her trademark. Arden collaborated with A. Fabian Swanson, a chemist, to create a ‘fluffy’ face cream. The success of the cream, Venetian Cream Amoretta, and corresponding lotion, Arden Skin Tonic, led to a long-lasting business relationship. This revolutionized cosmetics, bringing a scientific approach to formulations.

Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Cream re edition

Elizabeth Arden’s most famous, ’till today: Eight Hour cream. Here in a new re-edition .

And by the 1930s, yes, in the middle of the Great Depression, her company was bringing in roughly $4 million a year! In 1934, she opened the Maine Chance residential spa in Rome, Maine, the first destination beauty spa in the United States.It operated until 1970. Ardens passion in her work led in 1934 to a divorce. A second marriage to a Russian Prince lasted only thirteen months.

Elizabeth Arden 1930's

Elizabeth Arden, 1930’s. By the end of the 1930s it was said; ‘There are only three American names that are known in every corner of the globe: Singer sewing machines, Coca Cola, and Elizabeth Arden’.

1935 saw the launch of Blue Grass fragrance. It quickly became one of the most successful Elizabeth Arden scents.

Elizabeth Arden Blue Grass

Elizabeth Arden Blue Grass

Around 1940 Arden launged ‘White Orchid’ perfume. Other makeup innovations included creating foundations that matched a person’s skin tone; creating the idea of the “Total Look” in which lip, cheek, and fingernail colors matched or coordinated; and the first to make a cosmetics commercial shown in movie houses. During the second World War, Elizabeth Arden saw that market changed.  She saw the changing needs of the American woman entering the work force. She showed women how to apply makeup and dress appropriately for careers outside the home. She developed and brought a lipstick on the market in the ‘Montezuma Red’ color, a color that is applied at the red in the uniforms of the female soldiers.

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Elizabeth Arden Pink Violet, 1950’s (Click photo to enlarge).

Marilyn Monroe on the way to shopping at Elizabeth Arden Salon

Marilyn Monroe on the way to shopping at Elizabeth Arden Salon (Click photo to enlarge).

In the years Elizabeth Arden has many famous clients like Marilyn Monroe, the Begum Om Habibeh Aga Khan III, Nina Dyer Aga Khan and Martine Carole. Elizabeth Arden wasn’t only famous for her salons and Spa’s. She offerd a lot more! For (vèry) special clients, she offered treatments at home. She also sended ‘her’ hairdressers when they where needed….

Signed to Roger Flor, 1er coiffeur Elizabeth Arden, 1959 (29 x 39 cm)HH Begum Om Habibeh Aga Khan, signed for Roger Flor 1er Coiffeur Elizabeth Arden, 1959 (photo signed by Sam Levine)(Privat Collection) (Click photo to enlarge).

Nina Dyer Aga Khan Elizabeth Arden

Nina Sheila Dyer Aga Khan signed for Roger Flor 1er Coiffeur Elizabeth Arden (photo signed by Tony Armstrong John, Pimlico Road studio )(Privat Collection) (Click photo to enlarge).

Elizabeth Arden circa 1960

Elizabeth Arden, circa 1960 (Click photo to enlarge).

In recognition of her contribution to the cosmetics industry, she was awarded the ‘Lègion d’Honneur by the French government in 1962. Later in her life, Arden was one of the first women to appear on the cover of Time magazine, and one of her horses won the Kentucky Derby (can you imagine the parties she must have thrown?!), but it’s undeniable that the greatest accomplishment of her lifetime was her legacy of breaking barriers and making the world a more awesome place.

Arden died at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan in 1966; she was interred in the Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Sleepy Hollow, New York, under the name Elizabeth N. Graham. Her company was at that time worth between $35 and $45 million, and they possessed more than a hundred beauty salons all over the world.

Elizabeth Arden is now still a reputable name, but had some different owners. Acquired by Eli Lilly & Co in 1971; bought by Faberge in 1987, merged into Unilever in 1989. Later the Company split into two smaller companies: Elizabeth Arden and Parfums International. The Elizabeth Arden side, looked after all of the Arden cosmetics and fragrances, while Parfums International created fragrances for Nino Cerruti, Valentino, Karl Lagerfeld and Chloe.

Elizabeth Arden Ceramide Capsules

Elizabeth Arden’s bestseller and Holy Grail: Ceramide Capsules. It moists and restores. Perfect to take with you on holydays! Unisex and easy to use: One capsule for the whole face, neck, and whats left… for the back of your hands! (Click photo to enlarge).

On 31st October 2000, Unilever sold it’s Arden business, to US company, FFI Fragrances for $225 million, as part of Unilever’s program to shed operations that ‘don’t meet the company’s strategic needs’.

FFI is based in Miami Lakes, produce fragrances by Bogart and Halston. On completion of sale, FFI decided to trade under the Arden name., included in the sale was the Elizabeth Taylor brands of Passion and White Diamonds. Unilever kept control of the Parfums International brands (Cerruti, Valentino, Lagerfeld and Chloe). The current company name is still Elizabeth Arden.

In 2002, Catherine Zeta-Jones became Elizabeth Arden’s ‘face’ and corporate spokesperson. Catherine said; “I have read masses about Elizabeth Arden. She was a visionary, and I am proud to be a part of the company she created,” and; “As Miss Arden said, ‘to be beautiful and natural is the birthright of every woman,’ and I wholeheartedly agree with her philosophy, and dare I say, conviction to her dream.”

In 2003, Elizabeth Arden acquired the license for Gant USA fragrances from Romella.

In 2003, Elizabeth Arden Graham was posthumously inducted into the Canadian Horse Racing Hall of Fame.

After Ardens death the company founded itself partly, next to their skincare and makeup, on the development of perfumes. With classics like ‘White Orchid’, ‘On Dit’ and ‘Blue Grass’, a new Elizabeth Arden perfume was marketed under the name ‘Red Door’, named after her famous trademark (all her salons were equipped with a red front door). Furthermore, the company brought perfumes out for celebrities as Elizabeth Yaylor, Hilary Duff, Britney Spears and Mariah Carey.

Elizabeth Arden

Elizabeth Arden actif on African market (Click photo to enlarge).

elizabeth arden flawless future ceramid moisture cream complex serum eye gel 1

Elizabeth Arden Flawless Future Ceramid Moisture Cream Complex, Serum and Eye Gel (Click photo to enlarge).

Today, the company she founded brings in over a billion in sales and gives generously to causes including New York City’s public schools, Save the Children, and the Look Good…Feel Better campaign, which helps boost the morale of cancer patients.

by Jean Amr

The Origins of Cartier’s Legendary Panthère Jewels

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No other animal figure is more emblematic of a jewelry brand than Cartier’s panther. The iconic cat pounced its way into the French Maison’s designs in the early 20th century, at a time when animal skins were all the rage in the fashionable world.

Up until the First World War, the panther and its likeness rarely appeared in medieval and Renaissance Europe. Panther skins during the sixteenth and seventeenth century were prized items in curiosity cabinets, a valuable hunting animal revered for its exquisitely patterned fur. As Europe explored and colonized the world, European painters depicted the new colonies and their ‘noble savages’ wearing primitive swaths of leopard skin.

Cartier Boutique

By 1900, ‘Lady with Panther’ became a favorite motif in European art, much like the Virgin and the Unicorn theme during the medieval era. The subtly erotic and infernal nature of the combination was beguiling. The Lady-Panther subject was most notably rendered by Belgian artist Walter Sauer in ‘Femme devenue panthère’ in 1919 and fellow Belgian symbolist Khnopff in ‘La Caresse’.

During the early 19th century, the panther’s image as a motif was quite palpable, its rise in popularity partially credited to the stylish interiors decorated by Elsie de Wolfe. The New York native and amateur actress, also known as Lady Mendl, made her mark on society not on the stage but in her exceptional talents in interior décor. In 1907, de Wolfe was commissioned for the interior design of the newly built Colony Club, the premier women’s social club in New York whose building was designed by famed architect Stanford White. The rave reviews of her work launched her career as the preferred interior decorator of international society. More importantly, de Wolfe pioneered the use of exotic animal skins in interior design, examples of which could be seen at her Villa Trianon in Versailles.

Cartier Panter Earrings Art Deco

Cartier Panter Diamond and Onyx Earrings (Click photo to enlarge).

As the rest of the fashionable world followed suit in incorporating panther skins into their work, designers at Cartier found the panther skin ripe with inspiration, its modish print re-imagined in onyx and diamond. The first panther-pattern appeared on a wrist-watch in 1914, with its second appearance seen just a year later on a pendant watch.

Interestingly, the first image of a panther at the French firm appeared not in jeweled form but in a drawing by the great French illustrator George Barbier. In 1914, Louis Cartier commissioned the picture ‘Lady with Panther’ from Barbier to be used as an exhibition card. So striking was the illustration, which shows a lady wearing a Poiret gown with a black panther laying at her feet in between two columns, that Cartier later used it for advertising. However, Cartier had yet to create a reproduction of the panther figure in full.

Cartier Panther

‘Lady with Panther’ by George Barbier for Cartier, 1914 (Click photo to enlarge)

Presumably made around 1917, a vanity case owned by Jeanne Toussaint, a close friend of Louis Cartier’s at the time and later the firm’s Creative Director, featured the first representation of the entire animal. Fondly known as ‘Panther’, Toussaint’s affinity for the exotic could be seen in the number of animal furs she owned, as well as the panther carpets that adorned her apartment in Paris.

Cartier Jeanne Toussaint

Jeanne Toussaint photographed by Adolf de Meyer, 1920 (Click photo to enlarge).

Not too surprisingly, the design of her onyx panther vanity case proved quite fitting. It was the first in a series with animal decorations in miniature, based largely on Barbier’s 1914 drawing. In similarity to the illustration, the decorations on the vanity case depict a stalking panther in diamonds situated in between two carved emerald cypress trees instead of ionic columns. Other versions in the series include dogs at play and a leaping gazelle.

Cartier Panther Cigarete Case

This vanity case, made in 1928, is similar in design to that owned by Jeanne Toussaint. It’s made of gold, platinum, enamal, diamonds, emeralds, rubies and onyx. The interior has a mirror, lipstick case, covered powder compartment and a cigarette compartment. This item is part of a later series of cases also inspired by Georges Barbier’s drawings of panthers, dogs, and gazelles. Another case decorated with greyhounds belonged to Elma Rumsey, Pierre Cartier’s wife. (Photo: N. Welsh, Cartier Collection © Cartier) (Click photo to enlarge).

Though the abstract dot-pattern derived from the panther pelt would speckle a handful of Cartier’s designs from 1922 to 1927, it would be years before a three-dimensional version of the panther would emerge. That momentous event occurred in 1948 when the Duke of Windsor placed a special order for a panther brooch as a present for the Duchess of Windsor. The resulting jewel is a powerful yet simple composition: atop a 116.74-carat emerald rests a proud outstretched gold panther flecked with black enamel. One year later, the Duchess of Windsor added a second panther jewel to her collection, this time in the form of a pavé diamond panther with sapphire spots crouching around a stunning 152.35-carat cabochon sapphire. The third, and most exceptional, jewel in the Duchess’s suite of panthers was ordered in 1952: a beautifully articulated bracelet of an outstretched panther in diamond and onyx with emerald eyes. Even more cats would later be added to the Duchess’s collection.

Cartier Panther Duchess

Cartier Panther Duchess

The Duchess of Windsor’s suite of Cartier Panther Jewels (Click photo’s to enlarge)

It wasn’t long before society’s most stylish doyennes wanted panthers of their own. In 1950, Daisy Fellowes commissioned a panther brooch of sapphire and diamond, the design of which is clearly modeled after the pendant of the Order of the Golden Fleece.

Princess Nina Aga Khan’s appetite for Cartier’s panther jewels began in 1957 with a jabot-pin featuring an outstretched panther much like that of the Duchess of Windsor’s. Within a few years, the Princess would acquire the most extensive suite of panther jewelry from Cartier. Her impressive parure included an articulated panther pendant of the Golden Fleece design, an open panther-head bangle of similar design to ancient Mediterranean animal-head styles, a second fluted gold bangle with panther-head terminals that could also be worn as earclips, and a ring with a crouching tiger. She didn’t only love panther Jewels, she commisioned also accessoiries, a bag, watch  and picture frames.

Cartier Panther Nina Dyer Aga Khan

The third most notable collector of Cartier’s cats was Barbara Hutton, who opted for the firm’s tiger variations. She commissioned a brooch of canary-yellow diamonds striped with onyx along with a pair of matching earclips, all of which are in the likeness of the Golden Fleece, as well as a spectacular gold and black enamel tiger bracelet and an evening bag featuring an enameled tiger ornament.

Today, the panther remains Cartier’s most favorite designs. The older covetable cats continue to achieve astronomical prices at auction while newer versions are available from Cartier in a range of styles and prices, from the firm’s one-of-a-kind High Jewelry creations to more simplified varieties in the Panthère de Cartier collection.

Cartier Panther Ring

A coral, onyx and diamond

Cartier Panther new designs (Click photos to enlarge).

An Onyx and Diamond

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Cartier Panther

Cartier Panther

Cartier Panther watch

Cartier Baguette Panthere Watch

Classic Beauty: The History of Makeup

Classic Beauty: The History of Makeup

The definition of a beautiful face has never been constant. See how political and social climates have molded accepted beauty rituals and the evolution of cosmetics from ancient times through today. This colorful reference book chronicles historic trends for the eyes, lips, and face, and offers in-depth aesthetic reviews of each decade from the 1920s to today. Follow the rich history of facial trends through fascinating and bizarre vintage ads; detailed makeup application guides; and profiles of famous makeup innovators, connoisseurs, and iconic faces.

Over 430 images, timelines, and detailed vintage color palettes show the changing definitions of beauty and document makeup innovations (the first mascara, lipstick, eye shadow, etc.) that have evolved throughout the history of cosmetics. This is an ideal reference for the professional makeup artist, cosmetologist, educator, student, and general makeup enthusiasts.

A real must have!!

‘Classic Beauty: The History of Makeup’, hardcover for around $30 / €27

by Jean Amr

A piece of history: Perfume Houses

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What is your favorite bottle? (Click photo to enlarge)

We all have favourite perfume houses, do you? Brands, designers, independent and artisans. But whether you want to dig more deeply into the heritage and stories behind a name that you love, or simply to explore the universe of perfume houses (historic and contemporary) this is where you start.  Discover these fascinating stories through archive material and photography, historic advertising or today’s videos, and bring perfume alive…

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What is your favorite perfume? (Click photo to enlarge).

Do you all want to know about perfume house: Guerlain, Acqua di Parma, Caron, or Annick Goutal?

Or would you like to know more background from your favorite designer: Chanel, Christian Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Jean Patou, Pierre Balmain, Lanvin, Viktor & Rolf, Michael Kors or Calvin Klein ….

Or would you like to go more Italian style like: Giorgio Armani, Gianni Versace, Trussardi, Gian Franco Ferré, Moschino, Valentino, Cerruti 1881, Dolce & Gabbana, Fendi or Gucci……

Or more interested in the background of your jewelers perfume like: Cartier, Boucheron, Chaumet, Mauboussin, Poiray, Bvlgari,or Van Cleef & Arpels

Or would you like to know everything about the artists who created this beautiful scents?

The houses you will find under there Tags: ‘A Piece of History’, ‘Fragrances & Perfumes’, or look for a specific name…  about the artist, you will find under: ‘The Noses’

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Do you prefer a new or a classic perfume (Click photo to enlarge).

Dolce & Gabbana, Jean Patou Joy Forever, Elie Saab Le Parfum, Roja

‘Everything you wanted to know about fragrances, their creaters, rhe brands…
…………but where afraid to ask’.

Here on Yakymour! Hope you will enjoy!

by Jean Amr