Estrema Fulminea, a new teaser

Nero Notte, the color of the ‘Fulminea’ teaser for the weekend. A clear vision of the project, passion and hard work. This is the key to success. What about funding? Put yourself in the position where people will ask you to help you with, get them excited about what you do, share your vision and you will succeed. I have to say thank you to many highly talented people which helped me from the start, when it was just a dream.

Gianfranco Pizzuto, founder Automobili Estrema

Passion and vision slowly paying off. Come into the beautiful world of Automobili Estrema for many exciting future announcements!

Ares presents unique Tesla Model S Converible commission

Those who drive a Tesla Model S do not really excel in originality. That is, with just one body style and a handful of colors that you can order from Tesla, chances are there is one or more copies of your car in the same town where you live. If you want a special Model S, you can now turn to Ares Design.

At Ares, our Co-create philosophy allows clients to work side by side with our designers and engineers to create their very own bespoke vehicle, a service that is unique to Ares. This Tesla project is a superb example of this; it was a pure coachbuilding project which we very much enjoy doing and seeing the results of our uncompromising standards.

Dany Bahar, Ares Co-founder and CEO

Not willing to wait for the new Tesla Roadster, one car enthusiast demanded a Tesla S Convertible, immediately. And Italian coachbuilder Ares was more than happy to take on the challenge.

Italian luxury design house Ares has showcased its coachbuilding skills by revealing a privately commissioned Tesla Model S Convertible. Commissioned to transform the Tesla Model S into an eye-catching two-door open-top convertible the Modena-based atelier performed work on the body, chassis, aerodynamics and interior during the comprehensive coachbuilding project.

To achieve the conversion, engineers cut away the roof and removed the rear doors and the B-pillars to facilitate new, longer front doors. Centro Stile designed a new rear bonnet allowing space to integrate the roof when stowed. To finish, designers added a splash of Italian style with the fitment of a sleek Ares designed carbon fibre aero kit. Engineers retained the structural integrity of the Tesla by reinforcing the chassis with additional strengthening to the side members, beneath the cockpit and rear seating area.

Incidentally, the Model S continues to offer space for more than two people, because behind the front row of seats are two more seats that are tailor-made for this convertible. The interior of the Tesla has also been completely addressed by Ares, the finest hand-stitched ice white leather with orange detailing realised their client’s vision of a stylish interior finish.

It’s not quite as effortlessly gorgeous as Ares’ De Tomaso Pantera revival, but few cars are. Take a look at the new Ares convertible from all angles, and decide for yourself: success or waste of a Model S?

Come into the beautiful world of Ares.

Blaze EV Classic is a nifty classic-looking vehicle for one

Blaze, a Japanese company specializing in the manufacture of electric scooters, has expanded its range further. This is not the first car in the company’s range, as the Next Cruiser EV, a reduced electric-engined World War II Jeep, was already introduced earlier. Now it’s time for a miniature single-seater 1930s race car.

Available in four colors: white, black, green and red, the Blaze EV Classic is not exactly dwarf in size, as it is almost 2.3 metres long and has a width of just under 1.2 metres. So we’ve gained 200 kilos of weight, with the battery tipping the scales at a tenth of that.

The car features a classic design with open wheels and an open cockpit. There’s room for one adult in the car – or should I say in the vehicle. It’s enhanced with British sports car-inspired wire-spoke wheels and LED headlights with classic housings. The car also features a differential gear to help the car’s coercing ability.

The electric car has the technology of a real car, as the power is transmitted to the wheels via the differential. The operating distance is promised to be 50 kilometres and the top speed is the same number, i.e. 50 kilometres per hour. With the home charger, the battery can be fully charged in eight hours at the end of the ride.

Blaze’s EV Classic is a bit like Bugatti’s recently introduced Baby. Bugatti’s Baby is a 75 percent size replica of a real car and reaches a top speed of 68 km/h. Unlike the Bugatti, the EV Classic doesn’t really appear to be designed to look like any monoposto in particular, but is rather a general homage to race cars from the 1930s.

However, the two differ on one important issue. Bugatti’s small car costs almost 60,000 euros/$70.000. The price of the Blaze EV Classic in Japan, on the other hand, is 880,000 yen, or about 7,000 euto/$8,500 at current exchange rates.

In other words, Blaze isn’t cheap either, but definitely much more affordable. As battery technology advances to become more power-dense and cheaper, these types of sustainability vehicles may become more commonplace.

For now, the Blaze EV Classic is only available in Japan. It’s available in four colors – Reflect silver, Noir black, Smoky green, and Mystic red – and the company is offering several accessories, such as a dedicated car cover, spare battery, accessory case, and spare AC adapter.

Would you like to have one? I would! Come into the beautiful world of Blaze (translated).

Black is Beautiful, Ares Stunningly Restores Classic Porsche 911 964 Turbo

Italian coachbuilder Ares is known for two things: turning classic cars into modern drivers, such as the Ferrari 412, the De Tomaso Pantera, and for its roofless S1 Project Spyder. Now, the design company has put its hand to another cult classic: A one-off Porsche 911 Turbo from the 964 generation is the design studio’s new project – and it is absolutely awesome.

2021 kicked off with a cool new V8-Powered Land Rover Defender for Ares and the folks over from Modena have one more January surprise.

When the Porsche 964 Turbo was launched in 1991, it faced an uphill battle to win its fans over: this new generation of the iconic sports car from Stuttgart had been handed the baton from the first 911 to bear the Turbo badge on its rear bonnet – the legendary 930 – a car that changed the sports GTs panorama forever.

The 964 has always been a desirable iteration of the 911 lineage. With its cult status well-cemented in automotive history, it now acts as the base for a new restomod courtesy of Ares, which has overhauled the 911. The luxury coachbuilder has chosen the 911 964 Turbo, interpreting and modifying it, both in the aesthetics and mechanics; ultimately imparting its DNA which imbues every one of its creations.

Said to be a ‘unique creation, born from an enthusiast’s vision who wanted to realize his dream car’ and ‘an object of desire, as exciting to drive as it is to look at’, the Ares model is arguably one of the cleanest restored Porsche’s around

The car features many visual and performance upgrades but manages to retain the original Turbo’s DNA. The most notable appearance modification has to be the added fixed ducktail spoiler mounted on the redesigned hood. It gives the coupe that retro vibe the 911 Carrera 2.7 RS has.

Another touch in the same direction is the set of new wheels. The two-tone silver-black alloys have a design that’s reminiscent of Fuchs rims used in the same Carrera 2.7 RS from the mid-1970s. Other exterior updates include a new set of headlights and the quad pipes at the rear.

Inside the cabin, the Modenese craftsmen have created a new interior upholstery in leather and tartan fabric, decorated with a houndstooth motif, a gentle nod to the German manufacturer’s racing cars from yesteryear and one that Ares had already used on its Porsche 911 Targa GT3. Special attention has also been paid to the interface between car and driver: with new gauges and a PCCM infotainment system, specifically designed for classic Porsches.

Power comes from a base 3.6-liter flat-six engine that’s had its intercooler and turbocharger. But Ares has made tweaks to the car’s engine. More precisely, they’ve added a larger turbo and intercooler, increasing the factory output of 360 horsepower (268 kilowatts) to 425 hp (316 kW).

In terms of performance, although the 964 Turbo never lacked numbers, but unfortunately, the tuners are not providing details about the coupe’s performance capabilities after the performance upgrade. But it will probably be fast, very fast!

No pricing details are available either for the Porsche 911 964 Turbo, but you won’t be able to buy this car – it’s a one-off customer order. Come into the beautiful world of Ares.

Ares Design, Engineers of Emotions, in St Moritz

There is no better way to end the year than by showing some photos of the brand new Studio in St. Moritz. 2020 has been an exciting and busy year for Ares Design, and we can’t wait to see what 2021 has in store!

Exciting supercars, elegant grand tourers, luxurious SUVs and refined motorbikes: driven by the craftsmanship of artisan coachbuilders and cutting edge technology of the future, Modena-based Ares designs, creates and hand builds bespoke and limited edition vehicles for its discerning clients from around the world.

Come into the beautiful world of Ares.

James Bond Actor Sean Connery Dies at Age 90

Sir Thomas Sean Connery has died at the age of 90, according to his family. The Scottish actor was famed for his portrayal of James Bond, having originated the role of the British secret-agent 007 in ‘Dr. No’ in 1962. He went on to star in five subsequent James Bond films, ‘From Russia With Love’ (1963), ‘Goldfinger’ (1964), ‘Thunderball’ (1965), ‘You Only Live Twice’ (1967), and ‘Diamonds Are Forever’ (1971). Connery died at his home in the Bahamas.

We are devastated by the news of the passing of Sir Sean Connery. He was and shall always be remembered as the original James Bond whose indelible entrance into cinema history began when he announced those unforgettable words: “The name’s Bond… James Bond” — he revolutionised the world with his gritty and witty portrayal of the sexy and charismatic secret agent. He is undoubtedly largely responsible for the success of the film series and we shall be forever grateful to him.

Michael G. Wilson en Barbara Broccoli, producers

The actor was born to a working-class family in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1930. He became interested in acting in the 1950s after working backstage at a theater, and secured his first film role in 1957 in ‘No Road Back’. He was reluctant to star in the film adaptation of Ian Fleming’s James Bond series, but the movies proved to be one of the most iconic film franchises of all time.

When you think of Sean Connery, you automatically think of the most iconic movie car ever: the Aston Martin DB5 Touring. The DB5 was introduced in 1963 and made its star turn in Goldfinger the following year. Even though it ended its on-screen time with a crash, the DB5 forged a connection between Bond and Aston in the public consciousness. The car has appeared in six other 007 films since then.

After stepping away from the Bond series, Connery worked with directors such as Alfred Hitchcock and Steven Spielberg. At the peak of his career in 1988, Connery won an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the movie ‘The Untouchables’ (1987). His repertoire also includes many other well-known films such as ‘Marnie’ (1964), ‘Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade’ (1989), ‘The Hunt for Red October’ (1990), ‘The Rock’ (1996) and ‘The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen’ (2003).

Later in his career he was offered the role of Gandalf in the famous trilogy ‘Lord Of The Rings’ (2001 – 2003), but he ignored this offer. He admitted in an interview that he did not understand the script. Nor would he return in the fourth ‘Indiana Jones’ movie of 2008.

He retired from acting in 2003, Connery enjoyed himself very much with recording the James Bond film in 2005 and said he would like to do it again, but it never happened again. There were also rumors about a role in ‘Skyfall’ (2012), but this role eventually went to Albert Finney. A longtime supporter of Scottish independence, Connery was knighted in 2000.

Ares Design Pulls Back the Curtains on Roofless S1 Project Spyder

Improving and enhancing the automotive landscape with more luxury and personalisation is what Ares Design is all about. Revitalising and modernising classics cars, producing one-off supercars or carrying out customised fabrication is all part of Ares’s raison d’etre.

Ares Design has pulled back the curtains on its boutique supercar S1 Project Spyder. The new vehicle follows the company’s S1 Project Coupe, giving its Barchetta-style silhouette a roofless design this time around.

We wanted to create a model that is a true tribute to the pleasure of sport driving. This new [vehicle] adds more charm to the S1 Project design as it takes additional inspiration from the world of motorsport and the racing cars of the past.

Dany Bahar, Ares co-founder

Simply said, it is the homeless (as in no roof, no soft top or anything) version of the earlier S Project. Is that practical? No, not at all. Is it spectacular? Yes, very much – nothing that happens outside the car, in terms of smell, noise, wind and yes: rain will also escape you.

Did it once started with the Isdera Spider in the 1980’s! and the De Tomaso Guara Barchetta (1993), it’s a body style is somehow been quite popular with supercarmakers lately. Just think of cars like the Ferrari Monza, the McLaren Elva and the Aston Martin V12 Speedster.

Exterior

Ares’ S1 Project Spyder adopts the style of its coupé twin, but at the same time rebuffs it in a new form that is even more extreme and uncompromising, with a design enriched by the absence of the roof and the windscreen. To assure the ultimate driving experience, Ares’ Centro Stile designed two wind deflectors that flawlessly emerge from the streamlined bodywork, redirecting the air flow over the passengers into the air intakes behind the headrests and creating a virtual canopy and a calm driving environment, to fully enjoy the unique dynamic experience.

Coming with two deflectors, its windscreen-less design pushes up air current over the driver and into air intakes behind the headrests to create a ‘virtual canopy’.

The S1 Project Spyder fully embodies all the values of the Ares design language, where form meets function to offer unique style, unparalleled dynamic performance and a pure, unfiltered driving experience.

Engineering

Beneath its handmade carbon fibre bodywork, the S1 Project Spyder houses a centrally mounted, naturally aspirated Corvette C8 6.2L V8 engine. With a maximum of 8,800 rpm, the car’s powerful acceleration will deliver a 0-100 kph in 2.7 seconds.

Apart from its exterior body, the S1 Project Spyder does not differ greatly from the inner mechanics of its coupe twin. Under the hood, the car has a naturally aspirated V8 engine that can rev up to 8,800 rpm and put out 715 horsepower.

Ares Design has also created the bespoke exhaust system and revised the engine ECU to achieve a maximum power output of 522kw (715hp), delivered via the rear wheels and an 8-speed dual-clutch gearbox and double wishbone suspensions, with forged aluminium axles and adaptive Magnetic Ride Control.

Interior

Without the windscreen, the sinuous carbon-fibre bodywork of the S1 Project Spyder takes on a unique, organic form, flowing through the interior to divide and envelop the passengers. Bespoke hand-crafted and richly finished with fine Napa leather and Alcantara, the S1 Project Spyder’s interior reveals elegant, minimalist lines, with the HMI positioned entirely on the centre console and dashboard.

The vehicle’s open cockpit offers a bold contrast between the silver-toned body and its delicately handcrafted Napa leather and Alcantra-covered interiors.

The wrapping shapes contrast with the absence of a roof and windscreen, emphasising the sensations experienced while behind the wheel.

No official release date for the S1 Project Spyder has been announced, but like its predecessor, the model will be limited to just 24 examples. Units will be built to order, with order books already open.

Come into the beautiful world of Ares Design.

Lamborghini Adds Matte Color Options for the Urus With Graphite Capsule

Lamborghini is furthering its push for the Urus in 2021 with a new Graphite Capsule edition. Said to be the perfect blend of sportiness, comfort, and luxury. On the outside the ‘Graphite Capsule’ sees four matte paint jobs in ‘Bianco Monocerus’, ‘Grigio Nimbus’, ‘Nero Noctis’, and ‘Grigio Keres’, and one of four gloss paint colors for the accents, which are restricted to the front splitter, door trims, rear spoiler and wheel rims. The accents are available in green, yellow or two choices of orange. The monochrome base paints let the boldly colored accents really pop.

The exterior color scheme is reflected on the inside, where all the stitching and a few seat, dash and door panels are given the same color as the outside accents. The rest is finished in black. The aluminum trim is given a dark anodized finish, and the interior carbon fiber has a matte finish. A special option exclusive to the Graphite Capsule, as well as the Pearl Capsule model, is ventilated seats upholstered in Alcantara.

Still keeping its best power-to-weight ratio badge within its SUV segment, the Urus Graphite maintains its stats of 650 horsepower, 305 km/h max speed, and a 0-100 km/h time of 3.6 seconds.

This more personal approach to the Lamborghini Urus will start at roughly $218,000 USD. Come into the beautifu world of Lamborghini.

Yohji Yamamoto Teases Lamborghini Collaboration

2020 has resulted in countless canceled plans and shelved projects, but it’s been one of Yohji Yamamoto‘s most productive years to date. The legendary Japanese creative has partnered with Adidas, Hublot, and – of course – Supreme, but Yamamoto’s latest endeavor may be his biggest to date, as the 76-year-old designer has joined with Lamborghini.

Offering only two brief images and a brief press release, the duo have left the exact nature of their collaboration tantalizingly vague. In one image, co-branded Lamborghini badge is realized in Yamamoto’s signature monochrome shades, standing in stark contrast to a sample of what’s likely a custom body wrap for the bespoke automobile. Splashed with white and red streaks across a black base, the bold pattern features assorted kanji and katakana characters, like 呵大笑 and 力大笑 (essentially, big and powerful laughter) and ロマンスグレー (literally, ‘romance grey’).

In 2014, Yamamoto reflected on a love of cars in a NOWNESS video, explaining that driving his ’80s Nissan Cedric “is the only moment [when] I can become myself. A car is like a girlfriend. So, it’s nice to just look at her, or ride with her”. Yamamoto has owned vehicles from Jaguar and Rolls-Royce but reportedly isn’t a fan of contemporary car design – “I like glamour, but I also want to have a low profile. I find modern car design so ugly, so I found this car on the internet”, so a repurposed vintage Lamborghini may be just the ticket.

However, Yamamoto has offered little by way of this collaboration, including the era and style of car he’s revising. The designer explained that his Lamborghini partnership will reflect the ‘tradition’ and ‘DNA’ of both brands, honoring tenets like heritage, passion, craftsmanship and innovation. Note that this joint effort will not yield a production model; Yamamoto underlines that the resulting vehicle will be a ‘piece of art’.

Expect Yamamoto and Lamborghini to lift the veil on their collaboration in late October. Come into the beautifu worlds of Lamborghini and Yoshi Yamamoto.

This Is Ferrari’s One-Off Omologata

Ferrari understands very well that people with a few million on the bank do not want to drive the same car as their immediate neighbor, who lives 300 meters away. That is why as a valued customer (so you have to get some ‘standard’ Ferraris first) you can knock on the door for a one-off.

Ferrari will then build a unique model especially for you. You can then be 100 percent sure that there is no one else with the exact same car. The latest one-off is this Ferrari Omologata, based on the 812 Superfast.

One-off Ferrari’s are a rarity, so news of the Italian marque’s new Omologata is rather exciting. The Omologata is featuring a coachbuilt body that exploits “the proportions of the potent, mid-front layout”, as Ferrari says. 

The Omologata was commissioned by an unnamed European client and the brief was to create “a futuristic design with distinctive elements reinterpreted in a fresh manner to provide potential for a timeless shape that is certain to leave a lasting impression”. The name makes it clear that the Omologata also had to be equally at ease on the road as on the track.

Somebody in Europe clearly found the 2020 Ferrari 812 Superfast’s exterior to be a touch on the busy side, and opted to commission the Italian carmaker’s tenth one-off GT since 2009.

Like the story usually goes with these specials, the project took two years to complete, with Ferrari VP of Design Flavio Manzoni penning a hand-formed aluminum body that still wouldn’t clash with the 812 Superfast’s global crash homologation. Mind you, according to Maranello, the track-only mid-engine P80/C announced last year was a four-year job.

The Omologata even gets its own shade of Ferrari red, dubbed ‘Rosso Magma’. Finished in three layers of paint, it’s set over a darkened carbon fiber finish and is accompanied by exclusive racing-inspired decalsThe new Ferrari Omologata shares only its windshield and headlights with the 812 Superfast it’s based on, at least when it comes to its exterior panels.

With its round taillights and more pronounced grille, the overall result has a much more traditional feel than Ferrari’s latest gran turismo, the V8 Roma. The idea from the onset was to create a futuristic design with distinctive elements reinterpreted in a fresh manner to provide potential for a timeless shape that is certain to leave a lasting impression.

The objective was to exploit the proportions of the potent, mid-front layout to deliver a very sleek design defined by smooth volumes and undulating reflections, uplifted by sharp graphics with sparingly distilled surface breaks wherever dictated by aerodynamic functions. The trickiest aspect was striking the ideal balance between expressiveness and restraint: the Omologata had to ooze street presence whilst maintaining a very pure formal language.

The designers carefully studied the stance and attitude of the car from all angles, defining a tapering front volume from the flattened oval grille. The rounded section over the front wheelarches, emphasized by a contrasting stripe wrapping across the bonnet, seems to naturally extrude from the grille.

Rear of the door, the flank develops into a very potent rear muscle that neatly blends upwards into the three-quarter panel. The entire volume is rendered deliberately imposing through the elimination of the rear quarter light, while three horizontal transversal cuts in the fastback volume visually lower the rear mass.

The tail is surmounted by a prominent spoiler which adds not only downforce, but a more aggressive, sporty stance. Overall, the car appears to be poised to attack the tarmac even at a standstill and, seen from the rear, the deeply set single taillights underline the tension.

A fitting one-off exercise, the Omologata manages to encompass a range of subtle Ferrari signature design cues without falling into nostalgia. Its hand-crafted aluminium bodywork is sprinkled with almost subliminal details, in a way that challenges the enthusiast to identify the various sources of inspiration that played a part into its inception.

The 812 Superfast’s underpinnings and V12 engine remain, meaning the Omologata also packs 789 BHP which is good to push it well over 200 MPH.

I would argue that it achieved what it wanted. The Omologata corrects a few tiny details that to me seems to be misses on the 812 Superfast, done purely because the latest V12 is an evolution of the Ferrari F12, and thus had to be dialed up in all respects, except maybe for how tricky an F12 can be to drive.

Let’s choose not to talk about rear visibility at all, taking a peek at the cabin instead. Inside the car, it’s all about nods to Ferrari’s racing heritage, electric blue seats finished in a combination of leather and Jeans Aunde fabric with 4-point racing harnesses, stand out against a full black interior. Ferrari even deleted the rear quarter lights to make the atmosphere even more focused.

The electric blue seats, finished in a combination of leather and Jeans Aunde fabric, feature 4-point racing harnesses stand out against a full black interior.

The metal parts of the dashboard and steering wheel are finished with the crackled paint effect, which is supposed to remind us of GT racers of the 1950s and 1960s, as well as with Ferrari’s engine cam covers. With that in mind, both the inner door handles and the Ferrari F1 bridge have this hammered paint finish.

The 2020 Ferrari Omologata, the tenth one-off V12 from Maranello since 2009 leaves us with one question this week. Would you take home this unique multi-million-dollar creation based on the 812 Superfast, or one of Touring Superleggera’s upcoming Touring Aero 3s based on the F12? With custom Ferraris, it’s always a tough one.

Take a look at the one-off Ferrari Omologata; and note, that’s about as close as we’ll probably ever get to it, seeing this has been coachbuilt for one very lucky, discerning Ferrari customer.

Come into the beautiful world of Ferrari.