J.Lo Wears Tiffany & Co. for Her New Video

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Have you seen J.Lo’s new single, El Anillo? Dressed in skin-tight bodycon, embellished with diamonds, she has exclusively worn Tiffany & Co’s jewellery for the whole music video. The main attention straight goes to the 15-carat emerald cut diamond ring. It is set in an engagement ring, with her gold embossed initial on the signature blue Tiffany’s box.

In the video, J.Lo also wears gold jewellery from Elsa Peretti Bone Cuffs and T-Collection ring which were stacked on both of her hands! Talking about ultra-glam…

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The video has sparked a rumour that the singer has engaged with her boyfriend, Alex Rodriguez. When asked about a future marriage proposal to the actress and singer, “I will tell you this. She came out with a great, great song ‘Anillo’. I think it went up to one or two [in the charts]”, says Rodriguez, the retired Major League Baseball star, said during an interview with FOX Business’ Charlie Gasparino.

J.Lo has been actively promoting her new singles. Last Sunday night at the Billboard Music Awards 2018 in Las Vegas, J.Lo also wore her diamond rings and perform yet another Spanish-language single, Dinero.

 

 

 

 

Brian Justin Crum – Show Me Love (Acoustic Cover)

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Brian Justin Crum is a former America’s Got Talent contestant and broadway star known for his astounding cover of ‘Creep’ by Radiohead and ‘Somebody to Love’ by Queen as well as various Billboard artists, such as Sam Smith, Sia, and Adele. Brian is now making his way into the pop scene, celebrating the exploration sexuality and sensuality and showing more sides of himself through his music.

Former America’s Got Talent contestant Brian Justin Crum performing a beautiful acoustic cover of ‘Show Me Love’ by Robyn, and it is quite amazing!

To learn more about singing sensation Brian Justin Crum and his music, check out his official Facebook page.

 

 

 

Begum Om Habibeh Aga Khan and Curd Jürgens

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During the Third Reich, Munich was slated to get another opera house. With Clemens Krauss, who served in the joint capacity of general manager and general music director, Munich was able to develop even further despite oppression and war. Clemens Krauss supplied highlights both in his career and in the history of the National Theatre with the world premières of three works by his friend Richard Strauss, three fantastic anachronisms which nevertheless became artistic reality: Friedenstag in 1938, Verklungene Feste in 1941, and Capriccio in 1942. During an Allied bombardment in the night of October 3 / 4, the National Theatre was turned into an eerie ruin. Further damage and destruction as well as the proclamation of ‘total war’ silenced the State Opera for a while.

Her Highness The Begum Aga Khan III and actor Curd Jürgens at the Munich Opera in 1963.

Her Highness Begum Om Habibeh Aga Khan at the Gala Premiere of the reconstructed München Opera House, Germany, with good friends Curd Jürgens and his wife Simone Bicheron, November 23, 1963.  (pictures by C.P.H. van Heulen) (pictures from private collection).

The arduous tasks of restoring the theatre to life were assumed by General Manager Georg Hartmann and his General Music Director Georg Solti. After they had successfully introduced works by Paul Hindemith and Heinrich Sutermeister, and Werner Egk had established himself in 1948 with his Faust ballet Abraxas, Hartmann and Solti put on the first post-war Munich Opera Festival in 1950, creating on a firm foundation to pass on to their successors.

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Rudolf Hartmann served as general manager for fifteen years from 1952 to 1967, working side-by-side with general music directors Rudolf Kempe, Ferenc Fricsay and Joseph Keilberth. Two significant events occurred during the Hartmann era: the return to the restored Cuvilliés Theatre with Le nozze di Figaro in 1958 and the reopening of the National Theatre on November 21, 1963. With the aid of the ‘Friends of the National Theatre’ it rose in old classicistic glory like a phoenix from the ashes in accordance the plans of Gerhard Graubner and Karl Fischer.

1161055 (3)Her Highness Begum Om Habibeh Aga Khan and and Curd Jürgens

Begum Om Habibeh Aga KhanHer Highness Begum Om Habibeh Aga Khan and Curd Jürgens

1160846Her Highness Begum Om Habibeh Aga Khan and Simone Bicheron wife of Curd Jürgens

Divas Week: Celebrating The Birth of Diana Ross, Chaka Khan, Aretha Franklin & Mariah Carey

America loves it’s holidays. There is literally something to celebrate every single day of the year. From National Pancake Day to National Punctuation Day, we do it all here in the US of A. This week, March 23 -30, we are in the trenches of the holiest time of the year (sorry Jesus), for Divas Week! Somehow, Chaka Khan (23rd), Aretha Franklin (25th), Diana Ross (26th), and Mariah Carey (27th) were all born within these five days!

To honor this week properly, let’s get into the best and deepest cuts of our divas’ catalogue.

Chaka KhanChaka Khan

Before making it on her own, Chaka Khan was the lead vocalist of one of the hardest bands of the 70s, Rufus. Decades later, there are few people that can stand next to Chaka.

Aretha FranklinAretha Franklin

Live at the Fillmore has to be one of the best live albums of all time. If we’re being honest, Aretha Franklin taught the world what real singing sounds like. She offered up those receipts by dropping an album of covers that make you never want to listen to the originals ever again. Sorry Adele!

Picture: Aretha Franklin performing at McGlohon Theater in Charlotte, NC on February 13, 2012. Franklin performed a tribute to her goddaughter, Whitney Houston, who had passed away two days before. Photo by Daniel Coston

Diana Ross CoutureDiana Ross

Diana is the boss! What else needs to be said?

 

Mariah-Carey

Mariah Carey

Her… She is Mariah. The elusive chanteuse and next star of a sure to be sold-out Vegas run.

Sylvester at War Memorial Opera House

 

‘You make me feel, mighty real!’ Oh, how that lyric line sung by Sylvester, the Queen of Disco Sylvester over a gospel-tinged disco beat made those who heard and danced to it truly feel mighty. That one line can sum up the impact Sylvester had on a generation of club kids, an era of music.

Sylvester and The Two Tons of FunSylvester and his girls Martha Wash and Izora Rhodes performing live at War Memorial Opera House 

November 27, 1978, San Francisco was mourning of the killing of Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone by Dan White, a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. That evening, a spontaneous gathering began to form on Castro Street, moving toward City Hall in a candlelight vigil. Their numbers were estimated between 35,000 and 40,000, spanning the width of Market Street, extending the mile and a half (2.4 km) from Castro Street. The next day, the bodies of George Moscone and Harvey Milk were brought to the City Hall rotunda where mourners paid their respects. Over six thousand mourners attended a service for Mayor Moscone at St. Mary’s Cathedral. Two memorials were held for Milk; a small one at Temple Emanu-El and a more boisterous one at the War Memorial Opera House.

Sylvester and Harvey Milk

Sylvester & Harvey Milk

March 11, 1979. Sylvester, and his girls Martha Wash, Izora Rhodes, Jeanie Tracy and Sharon Hymes, together with a large band, and the complete 26-piece San Francisco Symphony Orchestra blew of the roof of the War Memorial Opera House. San Francisco where Sylvester wore the moniker of the Queen of the Castro alongside his Disco title, he blends all the colors in his musical palette into a work of remarkable imagination and spirit.

A genuine original, he was the vèry first ‘modern’ artist to perform in a classic Opera House, he was one of that special breed of performers who come fully to life onstage, who have the unfailing instincts to ignite an audience with sophistication, sass, and style. In a business where clones abound, Sylvester was the real thing.

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When asked about heroes, Sylvester is the first on lips of gay men who went out dancing in the 1970’s. Sylvester embodied the disco fantasy in wich race and gender lose their relevance.

Sylvester treated attendees to ballads, covers and medleys, in addition to Sylvester’s own hits. His falsetto sound was a mix of male and female voice. Most intriguing about the venue was the sheer range of material being performed. Sylvester covered everything from the Beatles ‘Blackbird’ to Billie Holiday’s ‘Lover Man’ to Barry Manilow’s ‘Could It Be Magic’. Sylvester’s reinterpretations of Thelma Houston’s Sharing Something Perfect Between Ourselves and Patti LaBelle’ s ‘You Are My Friend’ where the standout of the show as it showcased the genius interplay Sylvester, Rhodes, Wash and Tracy utilized in their live performances. Everybody sang along to the ballad version of You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real) at the end of the concert….  These last three songs where much more then just ‘beautiful songs’ in a time of the city’s mourning. There tittle’s say more then enough….

However, Sylvester’s celebratory music was the voice of gay pride. In bars, clubs and concert halls, Martha Wash, Izora Rhodes backed him. The night after his historical sold-out Sylvester Concert at the War Memeorial Opera House on March 11, Mayor Diana Feinstein declared it Sylvester Day and presented him the key to the city. The people where still mourning, but the Queen of Castro was their new hero, if he wasn’t already!

Sylvester performing live, together with the Two Tons Of Fun, ‘Can’t Stop Dancing’

The Opera House gig was recorded, and subsequently released as a live double album, called Living Proof. The album contained a typically eclectic mix of blues, disco, funk and beautiful ballads. Sylvester feld that Living Proof, is “the best representation of what people had been writing about me since the day I started performing. All the energy is there”.

Living Proof present Sylvester at a key point of transition in his career where he is moving more toward his soul and cabaret roots, and paying homage to the disco that took him over the top. It is also a few years before he would go on to define NRG music.

On the double album are two studio recordings: ‘Can’t Stop Dancing’ and ‘In My Fantasy’. ‘Can’t Stop Dancing’, a single released from this album, was a huge hit in the disco clubs.

 

Sylvester Living Proof

  • Sylvester (lead vocals)
  • Martha Wash and Izora Rhodes (Two Tons of Fun) (background vocals)
  • Jeanie Tracy (background vocals)
  • Sharon Hymes (background vocals)
  • Eric Robinson (background vocals)

The songs:

  • Overture: Grateful, You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real), Dance (Disco Heat)
  • Body Strong
  • Blackbird
  • Medley: Could It Be Magic (Eric Robinson), A Song For You
  • Happiness
  • Loverman, (Oh Where Can You Be)
  • Sharing Something Perfect Between Ourselves
  • You Are My Friend
  • Dance (Disco Heat)
  • You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real): dance version/slow gospel version

 

The band:

  • Patrick Cowley (Synthesizer)
  • Eric Robinson (Keyboards)
  • Michael Finden (Keyboards)
  • Tip Wirrick (Guitar)
  • Bob Kingson (Bass)
  • Kevin Dixon (Drums)
  • Richard Kvistad (Timpani)
  • David Frazier (Percussion)
  • Gus Anthony Flores (Percussion)
  • Dean Boyson (Trumpets)
  • Ross Wilson (Trumpets, Trombones)
  • Dan Reagan (Trombones)
  • Marc Baum (Saxaphones, Flutes)
  • Jay Stolmac (Saxophones, Flutes)
  • and the ‘San Francisco Symphony’

 

Two months later, on May 21, 1979, thousands of members of San Francisco’s predominantly gay Castro District community took to the streets to protest the lenient sentence received by Supervisor Dan White for the murders of local politician and gay rights activist Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone. Their anger–combined with the actions of police who arrived to quell the scene–soon boiled over into rioting. The resulting violence affected San Francisco’s LGBT community for decades to come.

Sylvester‘s voice helped foster that fight… ‘Everybody is a Star!’

by Jean Amr