Loewe and Sotheby’s for Loewe Weaves project

Spanish luxury house Loewe has teamed with Sotheby’s auction house to showcase its commitment to craft through the Loewe Weaves project. The objects presented include artisan-embellished Galician chestnut roasters, bags and accessories for a unique collection that resonates with artisanal craftsmanship.

“Craft is one of my main interests: one that I’ve made central to Loewe’s identity,” says Jonathan Anderson, Creative Director of the Spanish luxury house. Each project at Loewe is a way to explore a different aspect of craft. LOEWE Weaves explores the art of weaving, which can be employed as decoration or to build a structure. The main protagonist in the collection is a traditional handmade clay Chestnut roaster pot from Galicia. The holes punched – originally to allow the chestnuts to roast – have been re-appropriated by artists who experiment with different weaving techniques.

From May 1-12, Sotheby’s is exhibiting a selection of handmade pots created by master potter Antonio Pereira and reinterpreted by three artists: Arko (Japan), Min Chen (China) and Laia Arqueros (Spain). The works will enjoy an exceptional showcase in conjunction with Sotheby’s auctions of 20th and 21st century art. Loewe Weaves pieces will be sold at a fixed price on Sotheby’s Buy Now online marketplace from May 1. Loewe becomes the first major luxury fashion house to consign with the platform.

Each handmade pot becomes a canvas for international artists to explore a range of experimental weaving techniques, resulting in a collection that twists the functionality of these objects and gives the discarded materials new life.

Loewe also invited Spanish artisans Idoia Cuesta and Belen Martinez, as well as artisans from Loewe’s own ateliers, to experiment with over 80 chestnut roasters, giving free rein to their imaginations. Faithful to the myriad expressions of the art of weaving the artisans twisted and turned the function of the objects. The holes in the traditional roasters are braided or passed through with ribbons, leather strings, wool threads, straw or feathers, taking on new life. Some artists chose to glaze or paint the surface, while others left the clay untouched.

Each piece recounts a singular story, rewiring the initial function by playfully welcoming abstraction. Many of the materials that embellish the Loewe Weaves roasters are surplus from past Loewe collections. Reuse of excess materials to give them a new and vibrant life perfectly embodies the ethos of the Maison as summed up by Jonathan Anderson: “Authentic craft, for me, is sustainable.”

Loewe Weaves includes a collection of revisited iconic bags and accessories. Available from May 27 at loewe.com and selected stores, the Balloon bag is animated with a garland of flowers crafted from leather offcuts, while the Elephant bag is featured in woven raffia. “Across this whole project, I hope that what comes through is the liveliness and expansiveness of contemporary craft, as well as its playfulness. I am proud we have created singular objects that rewire function through decoration, and the other way round,” concludes Jonathan Anderson.

The main protagonist of Loewe Weaves is the chestnut roaster from Galicia: a series of handmade clay pots crafted by master potter Antonio Pereira (above).

In collaboration with Sotheby’s, selected chestnut roasters will be on display at the auction house’s New York galleries from 1– 12 May, and seven pieces will be available to purchase on the Sotheby’s Buy Now online marketplace.

The chestnut roasters are available in selected Loewe stores worldwide from 27 May. Come into the beautiful world of Loewe.

Hot off the press: A Show in the News

Read all about it: Spanish fashion house Loewe has presented its Fall/Winter 2021 womenswear collection titled ‘A Show In The News’. In a boundary-breaking (news) attempt to subvert the world of fashion as we know it today, the label’s creative director Jonathan Anderson continues his efforts to create paper-based shows by presenting the new FW21 collection in the most commonly-found media format there is, producing a supplement for newspapers that will feature in ‘Le Figaro’ and ‘Le Monde’ in France, ‘El Mundo’ of Spain, ‘The Times’ of London, ‘The New York Times’, and Japan’s ‘The Asahi Shimbun’.

Originally scheduled to take place today in Paris, the Loewe Fall Winter 2021 women’s runway show has been cancelled. Instead, the latest collection is presented as A Show in the News: a newspaper supplement that has been distributed in the world’s leading news titles.

It’s a response to a show that wasn’t meant to be thanks to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, but that hasn’t halted Anderson’s creativity. Instead, it put a fire under his feet to create something millions will see, emblazoning the supplement with a bold headline reading ‘The Loewe Show Has Been Cancelled’ alongside a Loewe logo for the masthead.

Upon reading your supplement, you’ll find imagery captured by Fumiko Imano that sees Freja Beha Erichsen wearing the latest and greatest designs from Loewe’s FW21 collection. Bright, acrylic tones flood the collection alongside structured graphics, which sees billowing silhouettes become seemingly structured with their use of lines – in short, it’s all very Mondrian, very modern abstract art, and perfect for when you want to feel special when dressing up at home.

Featuring Freja Beha Erichsen and photographed by Fumiko Imano, the presentation is accompanied by an exclusive preview of best-selling author Danielle Steel’s latest novel The Affair.

Standouts from the ‘A Show In The News’ include the lead quilted look. Quilting takes pride of place in the collection, but it’s strongest in the green and white coat that’s fluid yet firm. The shapes (in this and in the entire collection) are curvaceous but structured, and with this coat, the dimensions are only accentuated by the colorful lines cutting through it.

Elsewhere, the Spanish fashion house presents complete contrasts that are still playful. For example, there’s a black riding coat and matching culottes that are decorated with gigantic pink tassels, while an asymmetrical dress is covered in sparkles and glitter for a smattering of glam.

Electricity. The Loewe Fall Winter 2021 women’s runway collection is a bold, visually saturated statement in shape and colour, pumped up to the max.

Rounding out the ‘show’ is the return of Loewe’s Amazona bag, which first released back in 1975. It’s a quintessential Loewe accessory, and this season it appears in Nappa calfskin and anagram jacquard variations that fit perfectly alongside both the vivid and subtle pieces in the collection. Additionally, Anderson has made color-blocked lug-soled boots, pleated buckle and bracelet high heel boots, a new range of Puzzle bags, knotted and twisted bracelets and earrings in sterling silver, and finishes it all off with signature twisted chain elements in gold or rhodium-finished silver.

Free editions of ‘A Show in the News’ will be available at selected Loewe stores worldwide, until stocks last.

Loewe’s ‘A Show In The News’ can be seen in the photo’s above or in the aforementioned newspapers, and will drop in-store and on the fashion house’s website sometime this August. Come into the beautiful world of Loewe

Jonathan Anderson talks to novelist Danielle Steel

Spanish fashion house Loewe is one of the world´s major luxury houses. With over 170 years of history, today it is defined by the modernity of its past, an unwavering confidence in the present, and a firm look forward.

Craftsmanship, progress and unequalled expertise with leather, Loewe’s founding pillars, are reconfigured with a timely awareness evident in desirable and functional products across multiple categories, including ready-to-wear, accessories, home and lifestyle. Spain is where Loewe was born and remains the brand’s home. While its current landscape contains elements from places near and far and the Spanish legacy is expressed in modern ways, the heart of Loewe still beats in Madrid, where all of its world-renowned leather goods continue to be manufactured.

Jonathan Anderson is Loewe’s creative director. Anderson was born in 1984 in Northern Ireland. After graduating from the London College of Fashion in 2005, he established himself as one of the most acclaimed talents in the industry.

A Show in the News, the FW21 women’s presentation created in response to the cancellation of the runway show. Loewe creative director Jonathan Anderson speaks to two collaborators about their involvement in the concept.

Under Anderson, Loewe started a new chapter, presenting itself to the world more multi-faceted and dynamic than ever. Anderson’s first ready-to-wear collections for Loewe were presented in 2014. Streamlined, ultrasoft leather accessories are given a playful dynamic in the shapes of animals, and the T Pouch, now a bestseller, is the perfect hand carry accessory. The Puzzle, a completely new bag design by Anderson, his first for the fashion house, adds a novel character to Loewe´s range of iconic accessories, pairing of-the-moment functionality and aesthetics with ingenious construction and incredible softness.

Recorded on Zoom last week, Loewe’s creative director Jonathan Anderson talks to novelist Danielle Steel, as they discuss their creative process and prolific output. Danielle is one of the best-selling authors of all time, with over 800 million copies of her 180 books sold worldwide. The first chapter of her upcoming novel ‘The Affair’ accompanies A Show in the News for Fall Winter 2021.

The new Loewe Conversations podcast is now available on iTunes. Come into the beautiful world of Loewe.

Loewe’s Latest Bag Supports The Elephant Crisis Fund

 

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Fashion is increasingly aware of the need to support the world socially and environmentally. Recent years have seen fashion brands reconsidering their choice of materials (such as rescinding the use of fur or cashmere) or engaging in charity causes through their collections. However, it is not every day you get to see a fashion brand commit a hundred per cent of its sales to the cause, which is exactly what Spanish luxury fashion house Loewe’s latest collaboration with social media campaign Knot On My Planet is about.

In support of the Elephant Crisis Fund, Loewe has partnered with Knot On My Planet to launch a limited-edition run of its tan Elephant bags with beadwork by Samburu women from northern Kenya.

Loewe’s creative director Jonathan Anderson’s interest in elephant conservation was piqued after seeing the work of KOMP, a campaign powered by fashion influencers including Dutch supermodel Doutzen Kroes to stop poaching, prevent trafficking and end the demand for ivory. Through KOMP, Jonathan Anderson learnt the negative impact the ivory crisis has on the ecosystems of Africa and Asia, and was introduced to the Samburu community.

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Originally an innovative collection made out of leather offcuts, the cult animal-shaped leather creation is now a signature of Loewe brand offerings. Taking the company’s empathy for animals to the next level, Loewe launched a new variation of the elephant shape bag (a crowd favourite among the other animal shapes in the series) into a limited edition collection to benefit The Elephant Crisis Fund in preventing elephant trafficking and poaching, and hopefully in turn, minimise the demand of ivory.

Loewe travelled to Kenya to work with the women from the Samburu workshop to better understand the unique beadwork they produce. The project was born 15 years ago during a drought that saw the men in the community forced to lead the cattle to new pastures to graze and leave the women to fend for themselves and their children. The craft has given the female elders a viable workflow to sustain their families, and the strength as a community towart traffickers harming their home.

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The Spanish luxury fashion house understood that money is always steered towards many outlets of our daily lives, but arguably less for philanthropic purposes (as compared to necessary spendings such as bills etc.) And hence, Loewe has helped navigate our style splurges towards a worthy charity.

The new elephant mini bag design is adorned with unique beadwork designs handmade by women artisans from the Samburu Workshop which is part of an initiative by Samburu trust, a Kenya-based organisation that has been working closely with Save the Elephants.

Owing to the nature of the beadwork, each colourful cascade of beads on the Loewe bags is unique. See a selection of exclusive imagery showing the origins of the embellishment from Ol Malo in the heart of Samburu, below, and shop the bags at Loewe.com.

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All proceeds from the sale of this limited edition series will go to go to The Elephant Crisis Fund, where the most effective projects in elephant conservation will be funded and executed.

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The Elephant Crisis Fund is a joint initiative between Save The Elephants and the Wildlife Conservation Network, in partnership with the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, and aided by KOMP. In support of the fund’s 100 percent donation model, each pound from the £1,100 bags will be deployed to conservation initiatives.

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The Loewe Elephant Bag collection is now available on the loewe.com

 

 

 

 

A look At Loewe’s new book

 

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Luxury label Loewe began as a cooperative of leather artisans in the center of Madrid in 1846. The German entrepreneur Enrique Loewe Roessberg consolidated the workshop under his name in 1872, creating one of the world’s first luxury houses. As Loewe developed and expanded over the following century, a commitment to modernity emerged as a defining characteristic. In the 1950s and 1960s, Loewe’s offices and stores in Spain became a benchmark for international design thanks to the distinctive architecture and interiors designed by Javier Carvajal.

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In 1970, artist Vicente Vela created the In 1970, artist Vicente Vela created the Anagram, the abstract symbol consisting of four intertwined Ls that has been stamped ever since on Loewe’s products as a sign of their material and technical excellence. Loewe’s first ready-to-wear clothing collection was launched in 1965, bringing fashion to the heart of the brand, and this was followed by the debut of the iconic Amazona bag in 1975.

This was also the decade in which Loewe broke into the luxury perfume sector with its debut fragrance, L de Loewe. From that time onward, it has continued to demonstrate its prowess in this field with each new perfume creation. Emilio Valeros has been Loewe’s ‘nose’ for over 20 years and has created some of the brand’s signature fragrances including Solo Loewe and Aura Loewe. In 1996 the company was acquired by the leading luxury group LVMH.

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In October 2013, Jonathan Anderson became the brand’s Creative Director. Under his leadership, Loewe has rebranded its heritage of 169 years of craftsmanship and innovation with a view to setting its sights on the future.

Launched alongside the grand opening, just for their 170 years anniversary, of its Madrid boutique, a new Loewe book showcases the essence of what makes the maison stand out. Loewe has published a new self-titled book that takes a look at the maison’s 170 year history. Edited by famed publication expert Luis Venegas, the book intriguingly does not follow any typical format, instead opting to simply focus on the unique personality of the brand.

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It’s not about making clear, linear connections. It’s just our favourite side of Loewe, what we think makes it different from any other house, all put into
 a book filled with images I fell in love with. It’s quite subjective.

Luis Venegas

Given artistic freedom by the brand’s Creative Director Jonathan Anderson, Venegas pored over a massive collection of materials, carefully selecting what truly reflects the brand and which offers an insight into its future.

I wanted Luis to go through our archives and decide what is relevant, with
 that very sharp, uncommon eye that he has. He has unearthed some incredible things that show how the language of what we’re doing at the house now, has always been there. I could not be happier.

Jonathan Anderson

The 592-page book ‘Past Present Future’ is filled with editorials and old advertising campaigns, as well as images of archival objects and artworks. The aim of the book is not only a celebration of the brand’s identity throughout the years, but an intimate insight into the universe of a future-focused brand – to be used by readers accordingly.

It’s not a book to be precious with. It’s a hefty block of paper that’s meant to be used and engaged with, documenting the entire universe of the brand until now, indicating where it stands and where it might go next.

Jonathan Anderson

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Take a peek inside the Loewe book now…

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